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ECDawg78
06-11-2010, 09:01 AM
June 10, 2010
USC's punishment sends shock waves
By Pat Forde
ESPN.com

The NCAA shocked the world Thursday.

It shocked the cynics who didn't believe it still had the sternness to drop the hammer on arguably the most glamorous program in college football.

It shocked the USC Trojans, whose institutional behavior screamed defiance and indifference to allegations of potentially serious rules violations.

It shocked Lane Kiffin, who left a great job in the best conference in America for the captain's chair of the Titanic.

And it shocked a passel of blue-chip recruits who cavalierly signed to be Trojans beneath gathering storm clouds, and now must watch everyone else go bowling without them for the next two years.

That was the message on a thunderous Thursday from the NCAA to all of college sports: It may take forever -- four years, in this case -- but we can still deliver shock-and-awe punishment to a high-profile scofflaw. And we've got a smoking crater in Los Angeles to prove it.

USC was dealt with harshly for having enabled, marketed and profited from the semiprofessional careers of football star Reggie Bush and basketball star O.J. Mayo. It was slammed with a two-year postseason football ban -- one of just six multi-year bans in NCAA history -- to go along with a self-imposed one-year ban in basketball. It was deprived of 10 football scholarships for each of the next three years, to go along with a self-imposed scholarship reduction in basketball. Its record book was shredded, with vacated victories by the dozen. And the legacies of two USC heroes -- Bush and Pete "Cut and Run" Carroll -- were significantly tainted as well.



Which is why this is a good day in college sports. Not because USC took the biggest hit for a major program since Alabama football got slammed eight years ago. Because you, the fan, can trust the NCAA enforcement and infractions arms to go after the big guys with the same vigor as they go after the little guys.

(With, granted, a ton of help from the media reports, which exposed the vast majority of activities detailed in the report, and the NCAA posse rode in thereafter.)

[b]Southern Cal richly deserved to get hammered. As the Committee on Infractions' 67-page public report illustrates, USC operated a corrupt athletic institution for years.

Athletic director Mike Garrett presided over major violations in football and men's basketball without displaying much in the way of vigilance, concern, accountability or leadership. He is the common thread throughout a litany of violations stretching from 2004-08. He is the personification of a lack of institutional control, one of the charges the Trojans were nailed with.

And the fact that he's kept his job throughout it all is a condemnation of the school's administration.

But Garrett is hardly the only man in cardinal and gold to blame.

Save some calumny for Carroll. One of his catch phrases is "Win Forever." Today the operative phrase for two of his greatest teams is "Vacated Forever."

Not that Coach Cut and Run was around to feel the sting of it. He followed the example set by Dennis Franchione and other college coaches who skip town when the NCAA is making life difficult. Carroll turned down pro jobs year after year -- until he couldn't pass up the mediocre Seattle Seahawks.

And don't think Carroll didn't foster the atmosphere that created the Bush fiasco. His best USC players got Hollywood star treatment, with celebrities circulating freely within the program. The practice field, the locker room, the sidelines during games -- they were open to stars and opportunists alike. And when the opportunists got hold of Bush, he was happy to take what they were offering, allegedly with the tacit knowledge of his position coach, Todd McNair.

The circumstances were similar with Mayo in the basketball program. It actually was more egregious there, for three reasons:

1. Not a soul in basketball believed Mayo was an amateur coming out of high school.

2. Mayo's "recruitment" consisted of a third party with an NCAA rap sheet showing up and basically offering the kid's services to the school.

3. USC already should have been on red alert after the Bush allegations.

(The only area in which the NCAA went soft in its verdict was on the hoops program and former coach Tim Floyd. How Floyd avoided a show-cause penalty is beyond me, and I would have given basketball an additional year without postseason play.)

Yet the school seemed quite surprised to find out that Mayo was paying for precious little during his one year as a Trojan. And acting surprised wasn't going to be an adequate defense, with either Bush or Mayo.

"The real issue here is if you have high-profile players, then your enforcement staff has to monitor those students at a higher level," said NCAA Committee on Infractions chair Paul Dee during a teleconference Thursday. "It's extraordinarily important that you realize the people likely to receive these interactions from outside the institution are also those same people who are going to provide a reward down the road. High-profile players demand high-profile compliance."

At least USC managed to punish itself for the basketball transgressions. It dug in its heels on football, and you wonder whether that exacerbated the penalty.

Hiring Lane Kiffin was not exactly a iron-willed commitment to clean living. Kiffin was on staff as an offensive assistant when Bush was being showered with agent tribute. And when Kiffin bolted Tennessee after one season, he left behind a string of secondary violations and an ongoing inquiry into some way-off-campus recruiting efforts by Orange Pride hostesses.

"You'd never get anyone [on the Committee on Infractions] to admit it, but it certainly wouldn't help them [hiring Kiffin]," said an expert on NCAA infractions cases. "He has such a reputation, it couldn't have helped."

Despite a late start in recruiting, questions about his own threadbare coaching résumé and the ongoing NCAA investigation, Kiffin went out and signed a great recruiting class. ESPN ranked it No. 7 nationally.

Today, every player who signed with the Trojans has to wonder whether they were sold a bill of goods -- and why they believed it.

According to media reports, Kiffin misled at least one recruit -- superstar offensive tackle Seantrel Henderson. The New York Times reported that Kiffin told Hendersons and his family not to worry about potential NCAA sanctions.

"As far as he's been informed -- he was very, very choosy with his words -- there shouldn't be anything going wrong because there was no knowledge of anything going on by the staff," Henderson's father, Sean, told The Times.

The story continued: "The Hendersons asked Kiffin to be clear about what impact the NCAA might have on the Trojans' football program, Sean Henderson said. Just before Seantrel chose USC on Wednesday, Kiffin reiterated not to listen to others who said the Trojans might face sanctions."

The fact is, Kiffin and everyone else at USC had no way of knowing whether the school was in the clear at that point. To present any different message to recruits was dishonest.

But a whole lot of star players seemed willing to believe that USC was untouchable. They signed their letters, figuring USC would Win Forever.

The recruits and a lot of other people in college sports got shocking news Thursday. USC wasn't bulletproof after all.

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncf/columns/story?columnist=forde_pat&id=5273422

Cuz
06-11-2010, 09:17 AM
Lane "What, me worry" Kiffin's dream job just turned into his worse nightmare.

Is it true the sanctions call for Layla to go back to Florida?

IllinoisDawg63
06-11-2010, 09:23 AM
USC should just take their punishment and STFU! IMO, if their appeal process turns up nothing, they should get more just for wasting time.
F**K 'EM!!

joehogjoe
06-11-2010, 10:32 AM
USC should just take their punishment and STFU! IMO, if their appeal process turns up nothing, they should get more just for wasting time.
F**K 'EM!!
I haven't heard a peep out of USC, all I've heard is people gloating about the sanctions.

GoAU
06-11-2010, 10:43 AM
I feel bad for them - well maybe not :rotf:

They got what they deserved, and as for Kiffin - it couldn't have happened to a better guy.:doh:

Will they let recent signees transfer, as I believe has happened to other schools? I would love to see those stellar recruiting classes jump ship.

swampmonster
06-11-2010, 12:22 PM
LINK (http://bleacherreport.com/articles/326369-usc-ed-orgeron-commit-potential-violations-just-hours-after-hiring)


Although Kiffin may not have been in contact with any recruits himself, his recruiting coordinator Ed Orgeron was on the phone for most of the evening, mass "advice" to many members of the current Volunteer class.


LINK (http://www.sectalk.com/boards/ole-miss-sports/36444-ole-miss-recruiting-violations.html)


Ole Miss self-reports violations; All four, including one involving Deuce McAllister, deemed secondary by NCAA.

Ole Miss coach Ed Orgeron didn't return phone messages Wednesday.

LINK (http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angeles/ncf/news/story?id=4820737)


During Kiffin's tenure the Volunteers reported six minor NCAA violations ranging from mock news conferences for prospects to mentioning recruits by name on the radio and on his Twitter and Facebook accounts. Three freshman players were charged in an attempted robbery near campus, and the university recently confirmed that the NCAA is looking into the activities of members of the university's Orange Pride student ambassador program as possible recruiting violations.

I think the NCAA was also making a statement about the Ed & Lane show.

These two have been flirtn' with disaster awhile now.

I think Orgeron is dirty with a capital D.

Heck Pup
06-11-2010, 12:49 PM
Ed Orgeron should be banned from college football. He was trying to lure Tulane football players to Ole Miss after Hurricane Katrina when there were still bodies floating around in the 9th Ward.

Heck Pup
06-11-2010, 01:17 PM
http://i419.photobucket.com/albums/pp280/sicemdogs/USCWinForever.jpg

Dr.SwineSmeller
06-11-2010, 01:31 PM
Lane "What, me worry" Kiffin's dream job just turned into his worse nightmare.

Is it true the sanctions call for Layla to go back to Florida?

Lane still has the hottest wife in the caoching ranks... No disputing that...:kiss:

ugabrad
06-11-2010, 02:10 PM
This just in: Pete Carroll is "shocked" that the NCAA has penalized SoCal.

:lol:

swampmonster
06-11-2010, 02:17 PM
This just in: Pete Carroll is "shocked" that the NCAA has penalized SoCal.

:rotf:

Yeah....and he just magically departs the season before justice is handed down.

How convient. :rolleyes:

Bayou Bengal 72
06-12-2010, 01:22 AM
Mike Garret, the USC AD is probably a goner. This happened on his watch, the coach when all this happened jumped months ago, as probably did the assistant

By the way, here's a photo of Mike Garret when he was a Playboy All-American in 1964. That's him at 12 o'clock.
http://www.mmbolding.com/Playboy/Teams/1964a.jpg

Clockwise from noon: Mike Garrett, halfback, Southern Cal; Ken Willard, halfback, N. Carolina; Lawrence Elkins, flankerback, Baylor; Jerry Lamb, end, Ark.; Steve DeLong, guard, Tenn.; Ralph Neely, tackle, Okla.; Glenn Ressler, center, Penn State; Dick Butkus, linebacker, Ill.; Stan Hindman, guard, Miss.; Harry Schuh, tackle, Memphis State; Allen Brown, end, Miss.; Jim Grisham, fullback, Okla.; Archie Roberts, quarterback, Columbia. Center, left to right: PLAYBOY Cheerleaders Teddi Smith and Lannie Balcom.

georgiaguy31015
06-12-2010, 08:24 AM
Mike Garret, the USC AD is probably a goner. This happened on his watch, the coach when all this happened jumped months ago, as probably did the assistant

By the way, here's a photo of Mike Garret when he was a Playboy All-American in 1964. That's him at 12 o'clock.
http://www.mmbolding.com/Playboy/Teams/1964a.jpg

Clockwise from noon: Mike Garrett, halfback, Southern Cal; Ken Willard, halfback, N. Carolina; Lawrence Elkins, flankerback, Baylor; Jerry Lamb, end, Ark.; Steve DeLong, guard, Tenn.; Ralph Neely, tackle, Okla.; Glenn Ressler, center, Penn State; Dick Butkus, linebacker, Ill.; Stan Hindman, guard, Miss.; Harry Schuh, tackle, Memphis State; Allen Brown, end, Miss.; Jim Grisham, fullback, Okla.; Archie Roberts, quarterback, Columbia. Center, left to right: PLAYBOY Cheerleaders Teddi Smith and Lannie Balcom.

The Assistant coach was the RB coach if I remember right and he did indeed jump ship.

georgiaguy31015
06-12-2010, 08:28 AM
USC should just take their punishment and STFU! IMO, if their appeal process turns up nothing, they should get more just for wasting time.
F**K 'EM!!

Let them appeal if they want to it won't matter. They can't win the appeal anyway. I read somewhere the other day that the Appeals process is almost impossible to win. You have to either prove the punishment didn't fit the crime which is definitely not the case or that the committee had an agenda when they punished you which is almost impossible to prove in my opinion. Also, Carroll can claim that he is shocked and stunned and all that crap but the fact is his actions don't prove that. If he truly and sincerely felt that way he wouldn't have jumped ship to the first NFL team to come along.

Bayou Bengal 72
06-12-2010, 01:42 PM
Here is an excellent article from SHUTDOWN CORNER (http://sports.yahoo.com/nfl/blog/shutdown_corner/post/What-was-Pete-Carroll-s-part-in-the-USC-scandal-?urn=nfl,247361) at Yahoo Sports. They put some names to the NCAA report's references without names (student athlete A, sports marketer A & B). Also the L.A. Times (http://articles.latimes.com/2010/jun/10/sports/la-sp-0611-usc-ncaa-sanctions-20100611/3)reports that the USC "Assistant Football Coach" in the NCAA Report who had knowledge of all of this is Todd McNair.

Here is the entire NCAA Public Report (on pdf) (http://ncaa.pr-optout.com/ViewAttachment.aspx?EID=IHepzZCQPdH1AR50%2boeR8d6e %2fhIfTVcpMlzU0JhqOeU%3d)

From Yahoo Sports:
Now that he's the head coach of the Seattle Seahawks, people have been intimating for months that Pete Carroll left USC just in the nick of time. As the NCAA investigated the alleged violations that have now led to what amounts to a near-death penalty against one of college football's most storied programs, people in and around Seattle are doing an interesting dance with all of this information. On one hand, the penalties against the USC football team comprise a major advantage to any other competitive Pac-10 team, and the Washington Huskies (currently coached by former SC offensive coordinator Steve Sarkisian) are one of those teams. And any blight on the hated Trojans will go over well at Montlake. On the other hand, there is absolutely no way that Carroll wasn't aware of what was going on with Reggie Bush and others during his nine-year tenure with the university. Right?

A quick glance at the Public Infractions Report, which was released Thursday, unveils the following (from pg. 30 of the NCAA Report):

There was information in the record that the former head football coach encouraged sports marketer A to hire student-athletes as interns. A current NFLPA certified agent ("sports agent B") is the chairman of a sports agency and a colleague of sports marketer A. He reported that the former head football coach asked sports marketer A to consider hiring football student-athletes as interns in his agency. Sports agent B reported:

(Sports marketer A) was like, `yeah, here's (the former head football coach) and the year before, he, he's tryin' to get me to hire, you know, three players, you know.'

...How many players, I don't even know, maybe he tried to get him to hire ten....but it was totally agreed upon between (the former head football coach) and (sports marketer A) that there was an internship program for that summer. That's all I do know.

At the hearing, the former head coach denied that he asked sports marketer A to hire football student-athletes as interns, although he acknowledged that he knew sports marketer A and that he (sports marketer A) had "something about his past the years before that had gone wrong . . . (and) it was related to the NFL." [Note: At the hearing the institution's general counsel reported that, in 1995, sports marketer A had "pleaded guilty to mail fraud for defrauding the NFL."]

We've confirmed that "Sports Marketer A" is Michael Ornstein, who made millions in marketing dollars for Reggie Bush and did hire Bush as a summer intern, earning the princely sum of $8 per hour, according to this article written by Yahoo! Sports' Charles Robinson and Jason Cole. Yahoo's timeline then outlines how Ornstein advised Bush on potential agents, which sounds a lot like the kind of thing that cost Oklahoma State's Dez Bryant(notes) most of his 2009 season, with Ornstein ostensibly playing the part of Deion Sanders. (Note: Bush fired Ornstein in late 2006). And in that Robinson/Cole article, there's the first brush of the problems that have now come home to roost:

The benefits, which could lead to NCAA sanctions for USC and retroactively cost Bush his college eligibility and Heisman, were supplied by two groups attempting to woo Bush as a client. Current Bush marketing agent Mike Ornstein and one of Ornstein's employees were involved. So were Michael Michaels and Lloyd Lake, who attempted to launch an agency called New Era Sports & Entertainment, pursuing Bush as their first client.

Bush declined comment to Yahoo! Sports, and Ornstein denied any wrongdoing on his and Bush's behalf.

But documents and on-the-record interviews with sources close to the situation reveal that Bush and his family appear to have received financial benefits from Ornstein and a business associate.

If the charges in the Infractions Report are correct, it's tough to dispute that Carroll was skirting the truth. And if Carroll not only knew about allegedly inappropriate dealings with marketing companies possibly attached to agents, but helped to establish those relationships — well, yikes. And that's what the report makes it sound like. We don't know who "sports marketer B" is, but at this point, things just get weirder.

More from the report (pg. 31):

In the spring of 2005, sports marketer B contacted the associate director of athletics to determine if student-athletes would be interested in an internship with his (sports marketer B's) agency. [Note: sports marketer B and the associate director of athletics had been at another NCAA member institution at the same time and were acquainted with each other both there and subsequently in Los Angeles] The associate director of athletics confirmed that sports marketer B contacted him about employing student-athletes in paid internships at the agency. Ultimately, three student-athletes, including student-athlete 1, worked as interns at the agency in the summer of 2005.

The former director of compliance confirmed the associate director of athletics' account of how the internships came about and added:

. . . it was initially set up while I was there, and the talk was it was gonna be a continuing thing . . . to offer the opportunity to USC student-athletes.

And finally, the NCAA's problem with the way this was handled (student-athlete 1 is pretty obviously Bush):

It is permissible to hire student-athletes, as long as the circumstances under which they are hired, work and are paid comport with NCAA legislation. In this instance, the circumstances under which the three student-athletes, including student-athlete 1, were hired constituted a special arrangement made through the sports marketing agency and the institution's athletics department. Despite sports marketer B's claim to the contrary, there is no evidence that the internship positions provided to the USC student-athletes in the summer of 2005 were solicited externally. USC student-athletes and only USC student-athletes were hired for these positions. The circumstances surrounding the hiring of these student-athletes made sports marketers A and B, as well as their agency, representatives of the institution's athletics interests. This, in turn, gave rise to a heightened institutional responsibility to assess and monitor the employment situation and the relationship between student-athlete 1 and sports marketers A and B.

This leads right back to what could be the smoking gun in Pete Carroll's hand — per the same report, Carroll was going out of his way to try and provide internships, and possible agent opportunities, outside the NCAA's preferred ways of doing things. With two marketing agents involved, it's not known whether Carroll's involvement led directly to any hiring or possible illegal agent communication. But the larger issue expressed by the NCAA — a lack of institutional control — seems to have this at its root.

One wonders how the Seahawks, who chased and caught Carroll to run their franchise with all the ardor they could muster, feel about their new head man right about now. Perhaps it will be water under the bridge to them, as it will no doubt be to most of the team's fans. But if there's isn't a higher level of "institutional control" around Carroll than there was at his last job — well, the Seahawks should look into that.