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Heck Pup
06-04-2010, 11:10 AM
Great guy. Universally admired. The guy is a credit to college basketball and humanity in general. He was still answering all his fan mail and autograph requests a couple of years ago, in spite of his age.

http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angeles/news/story?id=5249138

http://i419.photobucket.com/albums/pp280/sicemdogs/john_wooden_pyramid.jpg

Rocky@theTop
06-04-2010, 11:41 AM
He is the greatest men's college basketball coach of all time. An amazing person too. Hopefully he's in as little pain as possible.

joehogjoe
06-04-2010, 11:49 AM
While his death will be sad when it occurs, it makes much more sense to rejoice his life and all that he gave to the sport and to people in general.

GatorMan32
06-04-2010, 11:56 AM
This will obviously be a huge loss on many levels. I do hope its as painless as possible, too.

socalwildcat
06-04-2010, 12:13 PM
LOS ANGELES - Former UCLA basketball coach and Hall of Famer John Wooden is hospitalized in Los Angeles, and one unnamed family member said itís ďa matter of daysĒ before Wooden passes away, KNBC-TV reported.


A fine and decent man. I expect ESPN, Digger and Vitale, to have some sort of tribute broadcast.

rolling baby
06-04-2010, 12:40 PM
Rip.............

UK'sRash
06-04-2010, 03:29 PM
I remember the ESPN special on how he writes a love letter to his wife on their anniversary. The thing is she has been dead for years now. No body has ever read what he writes. Here's to a great guy :cheers:

kentubbybasketball
06-04-2010, 06:40 PM
Yeah, Nellie was dead before we were even born Rash.

Although those great UCLA teams kept us away from a few national titles, I gotta concur about Wooden and what he means to this world and this sport. The first person to be inducted into the HOF twice as a player and coach... that says something. Crazy how his career would've been at Minnesota (my home state school) had the Gophers wanted him.

And, think about his impact on the sport. Obviously, his greatest protege is already retired himself, Denny Crum, but Wooden has influenced all his UCLA successors on down to Ben Howland. And, you think about Lew Alcindor and Bill Walton. I think Wooden in some way has affected anybody that's ever meant anything in basketball, because you can't reinvent the wheel, you can only take what's already been done and build on it. Wooden left a lot to be built on.

georgiaguy31015
06-04-2010, 10:21 PM
ESPN just broke it. John Wooden passed away tonight. We've lost a true legend and a great man today. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family.

boxvic
06-04-2010, 10:57 PM
Big loss to the world of basketball. He was a genius motivator and a master and innovative creator of the X's and O's. Lots of teams still use the basic high post plays that he pioneered.

He will rightfully go down as a legend. I remember as a kid hearing of him and his feats, and thinking he must have lived long, long ago to be such a great. My young brain couldn't fathom that someone with such a legacy could still be living.

Optik
06-04-2010, 11:22 PM
R.I.P. Coach Wooden.


ESPN Story (http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angeles/news/story?id=5253601)

LOS ANGELES -- John Wooden, college basketball's gentlemanly Wizard of Westwood who built one of the greatest dynasties in all of sports at UCLA and became one of the most revered coaches ever, has died. He was 99.

The university said Wooden died Friday night of natural causes at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, where he had been hospitalized since May 26.

James Wooden and Nancy Muehlhausen issued a statement on the passing of their father.

"We want to thank everyone for their love and support for our father. We will miss him more than words can express," it read. "He has been, and always will be, the guiding light for our family. The love, guidance and support he has given us will never be forgotten. "Our peace of mind at this time is knowing that he has gone to be with our mother, whom he has continued to love and cherish. We wish to express our gratitude for your support and appreciate your respecting our privacy."

With his signature rolled-up game program in hand, Wooden led the Bruins to 10 NCAA championships, including an unmatched streak of seven in a row from 1967 to 1973.

Over 27 years, he won 620 games, including 88 straight during one historic stretch, and coached many of the game's greatest players such as Bill Walton and Lew Alcindor -- later known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

As a coach, he was groundbreaking trendsetter who demanded his players be in great condition so they could play an up-tempo style not well-known on the West Coast at the time.

But the Wizard's legacy extended well beyond that.

He was the master of the simple one- or two-sentence homily, instructive little messages best presented in his famous "Pyramid of Success," which remains must-read material, not only for fellow coaches but for anyone in a leadership position in American business.

He taught the team game and had only three hard-and-fast rules -- no profanity, tardiness or criticizing fellow teammates. Layered beneath that seeming simplicity, though, were a slew of life lessons -- primers on everything from how to put on your socks correctly to how to maintain poise: "Not being thrown off stride in how you behave or what you believe because of outside events."

"What you are as a person is far more important that what you are as a basketball player," was one of Wooden's key messages.

UCLA issued a statement on Friday night.

"There will never be another John Wooden," UCLA director of athletics Dan Guerrero said. "While this is a huge loss for the Bruin family, Coach Wooden's influence reaches far beyond Westwood. Coach was a tremendously significant figure. This loss will be felt by individuals from all parts of society. He was not only the greatest coach in the history of any sport but he was an exceptional individual that transcended the sporting world. His enduring legacy as a role model is one we should all strive to emulate."

Wooden began his career as a teacher during the Great Depression and was still teaching others long past retirement. He remained a fixture at UCLA games played on a court named after him and his late wife, Nell, and celebrated his 99th birthday with a book he co-authored on how to live life and raise children.

Asked in a 2008 interview the secret to his long life, Wooden replied: "Not being afraid of death and having peace within yourself. All of life is peaks and valleys. Don't let the peaks get too high and the valleys too low."

Asked what he would like God to say when he arrived at the pearly gates, Wooden replied, "Well done."

Even with his staggering accomplishments, he remained humble and gracious. He said he tried to live by advice from his father: "Be true to yourself, help others, make each day your masterpiece, make friendship a fine art, drink deeply from good books -- especially the Bible, build a shelter against a rainy day, give thanks for your blessings and pray for guidance every day."

While he lived his father's words, many more lived his. Those lucky enough to play for him got it first hand, but there was no shortage of Wooden sayings making the rounds far away from the basketball court.

"Learn as if you were to live forever; live as if you were to die tomorrow," was one.

"Don't give up on your dreams, or your dreams will give up on you," was another.

Born Oct. 14, 1910, near Martinsville, Ind., on a farm that didn't have electricity or indoor plumbing, Wooden's life revolved around sports from the time his father built a baseball diamond among his wheat, corn and alfalfa. Baseball was his favorite sport, but there was also a basketball hoop nailed in a hayloft. Wooden played there countless hours with his brother, Maurice, using any kind of ball they could find.

He led Martinsville High School to the Indiana state basketball championship in 1927 before heading to Purdue, where he was All-America from 1930-32. The Boilermakers were national champions his senior season, and Wooden, nicknamed "the Indiana Rubber Man" for his dives on the hardcourt, was college basketball's player of the year.

But it wasn't until he headed west to Southern California that Wooden really made his mark on the game.

Wooden guided the Bruins to seven consecutive titles from 1967 through 1973 and a record 88-game winning streak in the early 1970s. From the time of his first title following the 1963-64 season through the 10th in 1974-75, Wooden's Bruins were 330-19, including four 30-0 seasons.

The bespectacled former high school teacher ended up at UCLA almost by accident. Wooden was awaiting a call from the University of Minnesota for its head coaching job and thought he had been passed over when it didn't come. In the meantime, UCLA called, and he accepted the job in Los Angeles.

Minnesota officials called later that night, saying they couldn't get through earlier because of a snowstorm, and offered him the job. Though Wooden wanted it more than the UCLA job, he told them he already had given UCLA his word and could not break it.

The Bruins were winners right away after Wooden took over as coach at UCLA's campus in Westwood in 1949, although they were overshadowed by Bill Russell and the University of San Francisco, and later Pete Newell's teams at California.

At the time, West Coast teams tended to play a slow, plodding style. Wooden quickly exploited that with his fast-breaking, well-conditioned teams, who wore down opponents with a full-court zone press and forever changed the style of college basketball.

Still, it would be 16 seasons before Wooden won his first NCAA championship with a team featuring Walt Hazzard that went 30-0 in 1964. After that, they began arriving in bunches, and top players such as Alcindor, Walton, Sidney Wicks and Lucius Allen began arriving every year in Westwood.

Each would learn at the first practice how to properly put on socks and sneakers. Each would learn to keep his hair short and face clean-shaven, even though the fashions of the 1960s and '70s dictated otherwise.

And each would learn Wooden's "pyramid of success," a chart he used to both inspire players and sum up his personal code for life. Industriousness and enthusiasm were its cornerstones; faith, patience, loyalty and self-control were some of the building blocks. At the top of the pyramid was competitive greatness.

"Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are," Wooden would tell them.

"He set quite an example," Abdul-Jabbar said in a statement released by UCLA. "He was more like a parent than a coach. He really was a very selfless and giving human being, but he was a disciplinarian. We learned all about those aspects of life that most kids want to skip over. He wouldn't let us do that."

Wooden never had to worry about his reputation. He didn't drink or swear or carouse with other coaches on the road, though he did have a penchant for berating referees.

"Dadburn it, you saw him double-dribble down there!" went a typical Wooden complaint to an official. "Goodness gracious sakes alive!"

Wooden would coach 27 years at UCLA, finishing with a record of 620-147. He won 47 NCAA tournament games. His overall mark as a college coach was 885-203, an .813 winning percentage that remains unequaled.

But his legacy as a coach will always be framed by two streaks -- the seven straight national titles UCLA won beginning in 1967 and the 88-game winning streak that came to an end Jan. 19, 1974, when Notre Dame beat the Bruins 71-70.

After the loss, Wooden refused to allow his players to talk to reporters.

"Only winners talk," he said. A week later, UCLA beat the Irish at home by 19 points.

A little more than a year later, Wooden surprisingly announced his retirement after a 75-74 NCAA semifinal victory over Louisville. He then went out and coached the Bruins for the last time, winning his 10th national title with a 92-85 win over Kentucky.

After that victory, Wooden walked into the interview room at the San Diego Sports Arena to face about 200 reporters, who let their objectivity slip and applauded.

Long before that, though, the road to coaching greatness began after Wooden graduated with honors from Purdue and married Nell Riley, his high school sweetheart.

In a 2008 public appearance with Los Angeles Dodgers announcer Vin Scully, in which the men were interviewed in front of an audience, Wooden said he still wrote his late wife -- the only girl he ever dated -- a letter on the 21st of each month. "She's still there to me," he said. "I talk to her every day."

He coached two years at Dayton (Ky.) High School, and his 6-11 losing record the first season was the only one in his 40-year coaching career.

He spent the next nine years coaching basketball, baseball and tennis at South Bend (Ind.) Central High School, where he also taught English.

"I think the teaching profession contributes more to the future of our society than any other single profession," he once said. "I'm glad I was a teacher."

Wooden served in the Navy as a physical education instructor during World War II, and continued teaching when he became the basketball coach at Indiana State Teachers College, where he went 47-17 in two seasons.

In his first year at Indiana State, Wooden's team won the Indiana Collegiate Conference title and received an invitation to the NAIB tournament in Kansas City. Wooden, who had a black player on his team, refused the invitation because the NAIB had a policy banning African Americans. The rule was changed the next year, and Wooden led Indiana State to another conference title.

It was then that UCLA called, though Wooden didn't take the job to get rich. He never made more than $35,000 in a season, and early in his career he worked two jobs to make ends meet.

"My first four years at UCLA, I worked in the mornings at a dairy from six to noon then I'd come into UCLA," he told The Associated Press in 1995. "Why did I do it? Because I needed the money. I was a dispatcher of trucks in the San Fernando Valley and was a troubleshooter. After all the trucks made their deliveries and came back, I would call in the next day's orders, sweep out the place and head over the hill to UCLA."

After he enjoyed great success at UCLA, the Los Angeles Lakers reportedly offered Wooden their head coaching job at a salary 10 times what he was making, but he refused.

Nell, Wooden's wife of 53 years, died in 1985. Besides his son and daughter, Wooden is survived by several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

I never knew that about Minnesota. Amazing how much that snowstorm changed their history, isn't it?

jh4uk
06-04-2010, 11:39 PM
[QUOTE=Optikslobb;1256725]R.I.P. Coach Wooden.


ESPN Story (http://sports.espn.go.com/los-angeles/news/story?id=5253601) He coached two years at Dayton (Ky.) High School, and his 6-11 losing record the first season was the only one in his 40-year coaching career.



i didn't find out until today that coach wooden actually coached at a high school in kentucky. he was a great basketball mind and an even better speaker. not a big fan of ucla but i respect what he/they had accomplished during the the 50's and 60's.

socalwildcat
06-04-2010, 11:47 PM
Huge loss for Angelenos and UCLA. Vin Scully gave a statement during the Braves-Dodgers game tonight. Look for ESPN to air a tribute show very soon.

Wooden's NC coaching record will never be equalled. 10 titles in 12 years is ridiculous...including seven straight. I lived that time and thought UCLA could not be beaten....a streak greater thean the New York Yankees in their hey day.

REBEL5 AC
06-05-2010, 12:32 AM
College basketball just lost the greatest man and coach to ever grace the game.

John Wooden was truly one of the real great men in sports.

Rocky@theTop
06-05-2010, 01:07 AM
What a great human he was...

socalwildcat
06-05-2010, 01:09 AM
College basketball just lost the greatest man and coach to ever grace the game.

John Wooden was truly one of the real great men in sports.

I agree with you completely. However, some ignorant UK fans call Wooden a liar and cheat....because he dominated over Rupp in winning ten national championships vs four for Rupp.....by devious means, never proven. UK sour grapes IMO. (Some UK fans just can't accept that another coach was greater than beloved Adolph)

I'm very fortunate to have once met John Wooden and he was truly a GREAT man. He was the Winston Churchill of USA sports. (In fact , Dick Enburg just called Wooden a Winston Churchill)

I'm just watching the local LA news/tribute about Wooden's passing and have tears in my eyes. At age 99, he couldn't have lived much lomger anyway...but to lose such a great man.

Sadly, Michael Jackson's sorry end last year will rank higher in the ratings. I suspect most teens have never heard of Wooden.

IllinoisDawg63
06-05-2010, 01:43 AM
Yeah, Nellie was dead before we were even born Rash.

Although those great UCLA teams kept us away from a few national titles, I gotta concur about Wooden and what he means to this world and this sport. The first person to be inducted into the HOF twice as a player and coach... that says something. Crazy how his career would've been at Minnesota (my home state school) had the Gophers wanted him.

And, think about his impact on the sport. Obviously, his greatest protege is already retired himself, Denny Crum, but Wooden has influenced all his UCLA successors on down to Ben Howland. And, you think about Lew Alcindor and Bill Walton. I think Wooden in some way has affected anybody that's ever meant anything in basketball, because you can't reinvent the wheel, you can only take what's already been done and build on it. Wooden left a lot to be built on.
I heard it said on ESPN, Minnesota wanted to hire him and Wooden was apparently trying to return a message to them, but bad weather at that time prevented it. UCLA nabbed him like a bargain.

socalwildcat
06-05-2010, 01:45 AM
People are crying here in Los Angeles. :cry: Tomorrow will be a day mourning. Ir's like losing Bear Byant in football. Wooden had a great life...but he never made more than $36,000. The stock clerk makes more than than today.

boxvic
06-05-2010, 02:02 AM
I agree with you completely. However, some ignorant UK fans call Wooden a liar and cheat....because he dominated over Rupp in winning ten national championships vs four for Rupp.....by devious means, never proven. UK sour grapes IMO. (Some UK fans just can't accept that another coach was greater than beloved Adolph)

I'm very fortunate to have once met John Wooden and he was truly a GREAT man. He was the Winston Churchill of USA sports.

I'm just watching the local LA news/tribute about Wooden's passing and have tears in my eyes. At age 99, he couldn't have lived much lomger anyway...but to lose such a great man.

Sadly, Michael Jackson's sorry end last year will rank higher in the ratings. I suspect most teens have never heard of Wooden.

I have nothing for respect for Wooden. He never did a thing the wrong way.

The people around the program though...

kentubbybasketball
06-05-2010, 06:10 PM
I agree with you completely. However, some ignorant UK fans call Wooden a liar and cheat....because he dominated over Rupp in winning ten national championships vs four for Rupp.....by devious means, never proven. UK sour grapes IMO. (Some UK fans just can't accept that another coach was greater than beloved Adolph)

I'm very fortunate to have once met John Wooden and he was truly a GREAT man. He was the Winston Churchill of USA sports. (In fact , Dick Enburg just called Wooden a Winston Churchill)

I'm just watching the local LA news/tribute about Wooden's passing and have tears in my eyes. At age 99, he couldn't have lived much lomger anyway...but to lose such a great man.

Sadly, Michael Jackson's sorry end last year will rank higher in the ratings. I suspect most teens have never heard of Wooden.

Not to detract from the thread at hand, but why is it sad that Michael Jackson may or may not get more attention in his death. Michael Jackson touched more people simply because his music reached all people in a massive way. Wooden was a basketball coach and only sports fans will truly appreciate him likely.

The real sad thing is that both are gone. Wooden lived a full life, fuller than most, however.

kentubbybasketball
06-05-2010, 06:12 PM
I heard it said on ESPN, Minnesota wanted to hire him and Wooden was apparently trying to return a message to them, but bad weather at that time prevented it. UCLA nabbed him like a bargain.

Yeah, I got the story a little twisted, but it's still a shame that Minnesota couldn't pull it off. Talk about changing the entire course of the college game.

socal, this UK fan doesn't have anything bad to say about Wooden. Much like Cal, I have no evidence that he cheated, so I'm not even get into that. I'm not sure why it even matters at this point anyway.

socalwildcat
06-05-2010, 09:17 PM
Yeah, I got the story a little twisted, but it's still a shame that Minnesota couldn't pull it off. Talk about changing the entire course of the college game.

socal, this UK fan doesn't have anything bad to say about Wooden. Much like Cal, I have no evidence that he cheated, so I'm not even get into that. I'm not sure why it even matters at this point anyway.

I agree with you, KT. But there are some UK fans who take every opportunity to disparage Wooden...even in his death. Just sick. It's some of the older fans that go back to the Rupp years. They just can't accept that Wooden won all those titles, passed Rupp's record, without cheating. My father is among that group. His view "if Wooden doesn't recruit 7 footers he doesn't win all those championships." Duh! That's the objective...recruit the best and win. Should every team be another Rupp's Runts?

Anyway, even if Wooden had shady recruiting tactics (not proven), to still win 10 championships and seven straight is beyond belief. I doubt with the same players, no other coach at the time, including Rupp, could have accomplished the same.

OffThePorch
06-05-2010, 09:23 PM
Wooden was the best.. hope he RIP!

IllinoisDawg63
06-05-2010, 10:12 PM
Yeah, I got the story a little twisted, but it's still a shame that Minnesota couldn't pull it off. Talk about changing the entire course of the college game.

socal, this UK fan doesn't have anything bad to say about Wooden. Much like Cal, I have no evidence that he cheated, so I'm not even get into that. I'm not sure why it even matters at this point anyway.yea, Minnesota got screwed twice-losing a chance for Wooden to coach, and in pro ball, they lost the Lakers franchise.

kentubbybasketball
06-06-2010, 02:44 PM
LOL, IllinoisDawg, and it's the city of Los Angeles that has screwed us. Minneapolis is my birthplace and I love it up there. They're doing great right now with Tubby.

kentubbybasketball
06-06-2010, 02:46 PM
I agree with you, KT. But there are some UK fans who take every opportunity to disparage Wooden...even in his death. Just sick. It's some of the older fans that go back to the Rupp years. They just can't accept that Wooden won all those titles, passed Rupp's record, without cheating. My father is among that group. His view "if Wooden doesn't recruit 7 footers he doesn't win all those championships." Duh! That's the objective...recruit the best and win. Should every team be another Rupp's Runts?

Anyway, even if Wooden had shady recruiting tactics (not proven), to still win 10 championships and seven straight is beyond belief. I doubt with the same players, no other coach at the time, including Rupp, could have accomplished the same.

I'm not trying to make excuses, but I do think it is fair to say the NCAAT may've been easier to navigate thru than it is now. The regions were actually set up as geographical territories. Winning 10 in 12 and seven overall though is something that's hard to do though. Phil Jackson for all his coaching success has only won 10 NBA titles in 19 years.

rolling baby
06-07-2010, 09:10 AM
Never heard the Minnesota story, but I've mentioned severals here on how Wooden almost took the UGA gig way back in the day but declined b/c of SEC's segregation policy. He saw the future and didn't want to be held back on the big stage just b/c some folks couldn't handle the concept of integration.


Those UK fans really don't have room to talk. Prob. the same ones that talked bad about Don Haskins.

joehogjoe
06-07-2010, 09:41 AM
Another example of one of the talking heads here moving a thread from where it was cause it wasn't purely SEC. HOW F**KING RETARDED.

thanks for the infraction on this. I know if must have felt sexy good.

socalwildcat
06-07-2010, 08:11 PM
I'm not trying to make excuses, but I do think it is fair to say the NCAAT may've been easier to navigate thru than it is now. The regions were actually set up as geographical territories. Winning 10 in 12 and seven overall though is something that's hard to do though. Phil Jackson for all his coaching success has only won 10 NBA titles in 19 years.


I was definitely easier. For one thing only conference champions and a few independents made the 25 team field. One year USC was 24-2, #2 in the country, and didn't qualify because UCLA won the Pac-8. There was no seeding...UCLA only had to win two easy West region games to make the final four.

XPS
06-07-2010, 11:48 PM
I agree with you, KT. But there are some UK fans who take every opportunity to disparage Wooden...even in his death. Just sick. It's some of the older fans that go back to the Rupp years. They just can't accept that Wooden won all those titles, passed Rupp's record, without cheating. My father is among that group. His view "if Wooden doesn't recruit 7 footers he doesn't win all those championships." Duh! That's the objective...recruit the best and win. Should every team be another Rupp's Runts?

Anyway, even if Wooden had shady recruiting tactics (not proven), to still win 10 championships and seven straight is beyond belief. I doubt with the same players, no other coach at the time, including Rupp, could have accomplished the same.


lol at your entire post. Why do u care what UK fans think about John Wooden? When you have Jabber and Walton on your teams without a 3 pt shot, you should win championships. I'm sure John was a great person and man, but if not for Sam Gilbert he don't win those championships... Need proof you say, hell, even Bill Walton says the samething about Sam....


I hate to say anything that may hurt UCLA, but I can't be quiet when I see what the NCAA is doing (to other coaches) only because (they have) a reputation for giving a second chance to many black athletes other coaches have branded as troublemakers. The NCAA is working night and day trying to get (them), but no one from the NCAA ever questioned me during my four years at UCLA."

That quote comes from none other than Bill Walton, maybe the greatest Bruin of them all, in a 1978 book "Bill Walton: On the Road with the Portland Trail Blazers," which went on to detail how Sam Gilbert, a Los Angeles contractor the feds allege made millions laundering drug money, bought a decade worth of recruits for UCLA.

"It's hard for me to have a proper perspective on financial matters, since I've always had whatever I wanted since I enrolled at UCLA," Walton said.



The NCAA never bothered to investigate UCLA during Wooden's time, part of its history of selective enforcement. During the 1960s and '70s, the organization, run by old white men, was too busy going after small, upstart programs that dared to play too many African-Americans, launching inquiries into Texas Western/UTEP, Western Kentucky, Centenary and Long Beach State.

Apparently a team capturing 10 titles in 12 years, putting together undefeated season after undefeated season, recruiting high school All-Americans from all over the country to sit on the bench, yet never having them transfer or declare hardship wasn't enough for it to dawn on anyone at the NCAA that, gee, maybe they're cheating?

rolling baby
06-08-2010, 08:45 AM
Most of those ncaa tourneys ended in Cali during Wooden's run, right?

kentubbybasketball
06-08-2010, 04:11 PM
XPS, fwiw, if Mario Chalmers three doesn't tie the 2008 title game, I don't think the NCAA would've vacated Memphis' season either. There's something about the NCAA not wanting to hurt its champion, whether the NCAA brass admits it or not. (See Larry Brown's Kansas team in 1988).

XPS
06-08-2010, 06:15 PM
XPS, fwiw, if Mario Chalmers three doesn't tie the 2008 title game, I don't think the NCAA would've vacated Memphis' season either. There's something about the NCAA not wanting to hurt its champion, whether the NCAA brass admits it or not. (See Larry Brown's Kansas team in 1988).


I agree KT...

socalwildcat
06-08-2010, 10:55 PM
Most of those ncaa tourneys ended in Cali during Wooden's run, right?

I would have to look it up, but believe only the 1975 tournament in San Diego (UCLA vs. UK) and one other were held in California. They were mostly held in the East.

REBEL5 AC
06-08-2010, 11:11 PM
Not to detract from the thread at hand, but why is it sad that Michael Jackson may or may not get more attention in his death.

I don't know, it might have something to do with the fact that Michael Jackson slept with children in his bed.


Jackson touched more people

I agree with that. FYI - For what it's worth, I love Michael Jackson. Great musician, just a troubled man.

As for Wooden, there's so much bullsh!t and bullsh!t people in this world that a man like John Wooden should be revered for what he was.

kentubbybasketball
06-09-2010, 12:05 AM
Well, I"m not gonna get into that with Michael Jackson simply because it's something I don't know about to be acting like I'm an authority. You may know what was going on at Neverland and more power to you if you do. But, it's not my issue. The man is dead, get over it.

Outside of your post, I think it says a lot that he may be more appreicate post-life than during his life. That says something about MJ.