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AlienBeans
08-13-2017, 12:20 PM
I haven't been around much the last few months, just checking in from time to time. My Father passed away on June 3, so its been a rough summer. Anyway, several here seem to enjoy this thread every year, so I had to come back and post it again.

For those that don't know, I've been officiating high school and semi-pro football for approx. 27 years. Thought this would be a good time to to post the rule changes for high school and for college. I know a lot of people try to hit a high school game on friday night and some of the rules and penalty enforcements are different between the two. First the rule changes. High School (National Federation) first, then the College Rule changes.


National Federation 2017 Football Rules Changes

2-3-10 (NEW), 9-4-3n (NEW), 9-4 PENALTY: Added a new definition for a blindside block and specifies a penalty for an illegal blindside block.

Rationale: Continuing with the focus on risk minimization, the committee created a definition for a blindside block. This block involves contact by a blocker against an opponent who, because of physical positioning and focus of concentration, is vulnerable to injury. Unless initiated with open hands, it is a foul for excessive and unnecessary contact when the block is forceful and outside of the free-blocking zone.

2-16-2h: Clarified that illegal participation fouls by R occurring during the kick are now enforced under post-scrimmage kick fouls.

Rationale: Illegal participation fouls by R occurring during the kick are now enforced under post-scrimmage kick fouls. Illegal substitution and illegal participation fouls by R occurring at the snap continue to be enforced from the previous spot.

2-24-10 (NEW), 6-1-11 (NEW), 6-1 PENALTY: Added a new definition for a pop-up kick and specifies a penalty for a pop-up kick.

Rationale: Continuing with the committee’s efforts to minimize risk, a pop-up kickoff has been defined. A pop-up kick is a free kick in which the kicker drives the ball immediately to the ground, the ball strikes the ground once and goes into the air in the manner of a ball kicked directly off the tee. Such kicks will be penalized as a dead-ball free-kick infraction.

2-32-16: Expands the definition of a defenseless player by incorporating specific examples.

Rationale: The committee adopted specific examples of a defenseless player. By adding these examples, the committee continues to focus on risk minimization and responded to requests on the annual NFHS football rules questionnaire from participating coaches, game officials and state association representatives.

3-4-7 (NEW): Added a new option to the offended team to start the clock on the snap for an accepted penalty inside the last two minutes of either half.

Rationale: The committee added an option for the offended team on an accepted penalty inside the last two minutes of either half. The referee continues to have the authority to start or stop the clock if a team attempts to conserve or consume time illegally.

7-1-6: Now stipulates that it is encroachment to strike the ball or the snapper’s hand/arm prior to the snapper releasing the ball.

Rationale: Defensive players are restricted from contacting the ball or the snapper’s hand(s) or arm(s) until the snapper has released the ball.

7-5-10: Removes non-contact face guarding from the pass interference restrictions.

Rationale: This change eliminates the previous foul for non-contact face guarding forward-pass interference.

2017 NCAA Football Rules Changes

It is now illegal for defensive players who run toward the line of scrimmage to leap or hurdle offensive linemen on field goal and point-after-touchdown attempts.

Players are now required to wear knee pads and pants that cover the knees. .

The nameplate area of the jersey is now included in the horse-collar tackle rule. So, it’s not just the inside (back and side) collar of the jersey OR shoulder pads, but also includes the nameplate on the jersey as well.


We'll get into some rule interpretations later.

Herchel
08-13-2017, 03:29 PM
Questi0ns.
1. Why is a pop up kick dangerous? Isn't that the typical onside kick?


It is now illegal for defensive players who run toward the line of scrimmage to leap or hurdle offensive linemen on field goal and point-after-touchdown attempts.


How is this different than the Boss Bailey rule?

Dr.SwineSmeller
08-13-2017, 03:38 PM
I'm sorry to hear of your father's passing, AB.

Thanks for the rules into. Always nice to go into the season fully educated.

AlienBeans
08-13-2017, 03:55 PM
Questi0ns.
1. Why is a pop up kick dangerous? Isn't that the typical onside kick? Not anymore. Several years ago the NCAA put in a provision for the receiving team to actually fair catch those pop up kicks which really eliminated the use of the kick in college. National Federation just took the other side of it and made the type of kick illegal. Personally, I think its a bit excessive, but we just enforce the rules, we don't write them. lol.



How is this different than the Boss Bailey rule?

Have no idea what you are referring to here. You're going to have to give me the details first. My take on that rule you quoted on the FG block, is that it was already illegal based on the hurdling penalty that is in place. Once a snapper has snapped the ball, no part of his body is touching the ground except his feet. Therefore, if anybody leaps over him (whether he lands on the opponent or not) is HURDLING and that has been a penalty for YEARS and YEARS. IMO, There was no reason at all to add this rule/penalty. It was already covered under the hurdling provision. In college only the ball carrier is allowed to hurdle an opponent. In high school, NOBODY is allowed to hurdle an opponent.

ugabrad
08-14-2017, 12:22 AM
"Players are now required to wear knee pads and pants that cover the knees. ."

It has seemed strange to me that in recent years basketball players have been wearing shorts that cover the knees (and then some) while many football players have been wearing pants that don't.

ALA2262
08-14-2017, 09:30 AM
7-1-6: Now stipulates that it is encroachment to strike the ball or the snapper’s hand/arm prior to the snapper releasing the ball.

Rationale: Defensive players are restricted from contacting the ball or the snapper’s hand(s) or arm(s) until the snapper has released the ball.

Huh!? Can't believe that wasn't always encroachment. Heck, in basketball that is a technical foul on a throw-in.

AlienBeans
08-15-2017, 06:25 PM
7-1-6: Now stipulates that it is encroachment to strike the ball or the snapper’s hand/arm prior to the snapper releasing the ball.

Rationale: Defensive players are restricted from contacting the ball or the snapper’s hand(s) or arm(s) until the snapper has released the ball.

Huh!? Can't believe that wasn't always encroachment. Heck, in basketball that is a technical foul on a throw-in.

It wasn't because when the ball moves it was always fair game. Now, the defense has to allow the snapper to complete the snap. Believe it or not, this didn't happen near as often as the casual fan may think it does.

AlienBeans
08-16-2017, 07:10 AM
Here's a play for some of you to digest.

This happened either last year or the year before. Opening kickoff between Western Illinois and Wisconsin. Wisconsin kicks off to Western Illinois. The kick is approx. 2 yards deep in the endzone. The returner attempts to field the ball and he muffs it. If deflects off his chest, forward to about the half yard line.. The player with his feet still standing on the goal line or in the endzone, reaches out to gain possession of the ball, and pull it back into his body while staying in the endzone. RULING: SAFETY. While the player never left the endzone, the ball did and in college (and high school) the location of the ball is all that matters. Super easy call here, although they did check the replay to be sure. SAFETY - 2 points for Wisconsin. Note: In High school rules this is a touchback because kicks can't be run out of the endzone. The kick is blown dead the second it breaks the plane of the goal line and securing possession doesn't matter.

Herchel
08-16-2017, 08:20 AM
Have no idea what you are referring to here. You're going to have to give me the details first. My take on that rule you quoted on the FG block, is that it was already illegal based on the hurdling penalty that is in place. Once a snapper has snapped the ball, no part of his body is touching the ground except his feet. Therefore, if anybody leaps over him (whether he lands on the opponent or not) is HURDLING and that has been a penalty for YEARS and YEARS. IMO, There was no reason at all to add this rule/penalty. It was already covered under the hurdling provision. In college only the ball carrier is allowed to hurdle an opponent. In high school, NOBODY is allowed to hurdle an opponent.
Boss bailey had a 46" vertical. He blocked 4 field goals one year and the NCAA made a new rule. Our D line would drive a guard back, Boss would run toward the line and jump straight up.

AlienBeans
08-26-2017, 11:21 AM
New play:

Opening kickoff between Western Illinois and Wisconsin. Wisconsin kicks off to Western Illinois. The kick is approx. 2 yards deep in the endzone. The returner attempts to field the ball and he muffs it. If deflects off his chest, forward to about the half yard line.. The player with his feet still standing on the goal line or in the endzone, reaches out to gain possession of the ball, and pull it back into his body while staying in the endzone. RULING: SAFETY. While the player never left the endzone, the ball did and in college (and high school) the location of the ball is all that matters. Super easy call here, although they did check the replay to be sure. SAFETY - 2 points for Wisconsin. Note: In High school rules this is a touchback because kicks can't be run out of the endzone. The kick is blown dead the second it breaks the plane of the goal line and securing possession doesn't matter.

AlienBeans
09-10-2017, 11:49 AM
Play that happened last night in Auburn's game vs. Clemson. The Auburn fans were livid over the call, but the officials got it right. The play occurred in the 1st half. QB takes the snap, gives to the RB going to the right side. The RB hands off to another back coming back toward the middle of the field. That back then tosses the ball back to Stidham. Stidham is under heavy rush and he throws the ball away to avoid the loss yardage. Result: INTENTIONAL GROUNDING. While he was clearly outside the tackles (he was actually close to the numbers), once the QB gives up possession of the ball, he can no longer throw the ball away to avoid loss yardage. Here's the rule on it:

[Exception: It is not a foul if the passer is or has been outside the tackle
box and throws the ball so that it crosses or lands beyond the neutral
zone or neutral zone extended (Rule 2-19-3) (A.R. 7-3-2-VIII-X).
This applies only to the player who controls the snap or the resulting
backward pass and retains possession before throwing the forward pass.]

GR8NESS
09-10-2017, 12:48 PM
Have no idea what you are referring to here. You're going to have to give me the details first. My take on that rule you quoted on the FG block, is that it was already illegal based on the hurdling penalty that is in place. Once a snapper has snapped the ball, no part of his body is touching the ground except his feet. Therefore, if anybody leaps over him (whether he lands on the opponent or not) is HURDLING and that has been a penalty for YEARS and YEARS. IMO, There was no reason at all to add this rule/penalty. It was already covered under the hurdling provision. In college only the ball carrier is allowed to hurdle an opponent. In high school, NOBODY is allowed to hurdle an opponent.

How was the MSST punt block last night not a violation of the "hurdle" rule? I'm assuming I'm missing something small in the description of the rule.

AlienBeans
09-10-2017, 02:33 PM
How was the MSST punt block last night not a violation of the "hurdle" rule? I'm assuming I'm missing something small in the description of the rule.

Didn't see the play. If you have a link to it, provide it and I'll look at it.

zud the hut
09-10-2017, 05:32 PM
Also, the play with Mississippi State and Lawyers. Tech. It looked like they were kicking the ball down field. La. Tech had a second and goal and ended up with a 3rd and 93. I'm curious about the rule when there is a fumble and everyone is pushing the ball down field.

AlienBeans
09-10-2017, 05:57 PM
Also, the play with Mississippi State and Lawyers. Tech. It looked like they were kicking the ball down field. La. Tech had a second and goal and ended up with a 3rd and 93. I'm curious about the rule when there is a fumble and everyone is pushing the ball down field.
It looked ugly for sure, but there wasn't anything there that was illegal that should have been flagged and penalized. It's just a fumble.

GR8NESS
09-10-2017, 08:30 PM
Didn't see the play. If you have a link to it, provide it and I'll look at it.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.seccountry.com/mississippi-state/watch-mississippi-state-dl-jeffery-simmons-blocks-punt-recovers-td/amp

I'm guessing it's because he didn't clear the guy, but a UK DL was flagged for the exact same move (except we didn't get te block)

AlienBeans
09-11-2017, 07:16 AM
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.seccountry.com/mississippi-state/watch-mississippi-state-dl-jeffery-simmons-blocks-punt-recovers-td/amp

I'm guessing it's because he didn't clear the guy, but a UK DL was flagged for the exact same move (except we didn't get te block)

That's not hurdling. For it to be hurdling, he has to jump feet first over an opponent. He didn't do that. Now, there was a provision put in the book a few years ago about jumping that shield in front of the punter. I can't find it right off hand looking right now, but will look again when I get home. Here's the definition of hurdling. Hurdling is a term that is extremely misused particularly by announcers. They don't know what constitutes hurdling either. Think track and field and the hurdles they run. That's how they have to jump over an opponent for it to be hurdling.

ARTICLE 1. a. Hurdling is an attempt by a player to jump with one or
both feet or knees foremost over an opponent who is still on his feet (Rule
9-1-13).
b. “On his feet’’ means that no part of the opponent’s body other than one
or both feet is in contact with the ground.

ugabrad
09-11-2017, 11:15 AM
So does that mean that a running back can no longer hurdle an opponent in order to avoid being tackled, or does it apply only to defensive players?

AlienBeans
09-11-2017, 04:04 PM
So does that mean that a running back can no longer hurdle an opponent in order to avoid being tackled, or does it apply only to defensive players?

In college, Hurdling is illegal, but there is what's referred to as an exception that allows the RB to legally hurdle an opponent. In High School, hurdling is ILLEGAL for everybody. 15 yard Personal Foul penalty.

AlienBeans
09-21-2017, 06:30 AM
Here is something I thought I had already posted. Most will probably know some of these (but perhaps not all). It's worth a refresher since we are still early in the season.
This is covering some difference in terminology (often misused) and some differences in penalty enforcement from High School to the College level.

Pass Interference – Defensive players have equal right to the ball. In high school there is no such thing as an uncatchable pass. The penalty enforcement on this from high school to college is very different. In college, if the pass interference occurs less than 15 yards from the original line of scrimmage, the penalty is what’s called a spot foul, meaning the ball is placed at the spot of the interference and its an automatic first down. IF the penalty occurs further than 15 yards downfield from the line of scrimmage, then it’s a 15 yard penalty from the original line of scrimmage (previous spot) and a 1st down. In high school all Pass Interference penalties are 15 yards from the previous spot. HOWEVER, a penalty for defensive pass interference no longer carries an automatic first down. If the previous down was 3rd and 20 and there is a DPI penalty called, the next play would be 3rd and 5. It’s also no longer a loss of down for offensive pass interference either. NOTE: In college rules there must be contact for pass interference to occur. In high school contact is NOT required for either team to be guilty of pass interference. In high school there is a rule against face guarding, meaning you can’t wave your hands in front of the face of the opponent to obstruct his vision. This is pass interference.


MUFF vs. FUMBLE – These are two terms that are often misused and in the case of the muff rarely used at all particularly by announcers. So, what’s the difference? MUFF – TOUCHING the ball in an attempt to secure possession (kick returner//punt returner). FUMBLE – losing the ball AFTER possession has been established.


Free kicks (kickoffs) – It’s now illegal for the kicking team to block the receiving team before the kicking team is eligible to recover the kick. In high school its illegal for the kicking team to catch the kicked ball in flight. (KICK CATCHING INTERFERENCE) . In both college and High school, the kicking team cannot advance the ball until the kick ends. When does the kick end?? It ends when its POSSESSED by a member of the receiving team or kicking team. IF a member of the receiving team TOUCHES the kick, the kick is NOT OVER. The kicking team can now legally recover the ball and retain possession but they CANNOT ADVANCE IT. This applies to free kicks and scrimmage kicks (Kickoffs and punts). Onside kicks, the kicking team can recover the kick and retain possession once either the kick travels 10 yards OR the receiving team touches the kick. That same kick CANNOT be advanced by the kickers. The ball is dead where they gained possession.

Still on kicks. What is First touching or ILLEGAL TOUCHING. First the terms mean the same thing. First touching is the high school term for it and Illegal touching is the college term. Neither one carries a distance penalty. So what is first/illegal touching. It’s basically the touching of a scrimmage kick or free kick by the kicking team before they are legally allowed to touch it. For example. On a kickoff from the 40 (high school) 35 (college), the kicking team touches it after it travel 5 yards from the respective kick off location. Now, what does it mean? It means the receiving team can advance the ball basically without consequence. In other words, if they return the kick for a touchdown, the TD will count and we’ll move on to the try for point. IF however, the receiving team returns the kick (after the touching) and subsequently fumbles and the kicking team recovers it, then the receiving team can take the result of the play (which they won’t since they lost possession) OR they can take the ball 1st and 10 at the spot of the illegal touching. Can there be more than one spot of illegal/first touching? Yes.

Intentional grounding: We see on the college game that once the QB is outside the tackle box (see first note above concerning the tackle box) that the QB can legally throw the ball away to save lost yardage, provided the throw went passed the line of scrimmage. However, this rule is NOT in place in the high school game. There’s no such provision in high school to allow the QB to legally throw the ball away to avoid lost yardage. Also, in college where this rule is in effect, this rule ONLY applies to the player that took the snap. In other words, if a QB takes the snap, hands to the RB where he is supposed to pull up and throw the ball downfield, the RB that now has the ball cannot legally throw the ball away to save lost yardage. That’s Intentional Grounding.


Penalties on scoring plays. In high school if the defense commits a penalty during a play in which the offense scores, the penalty on that play is no longer automatically declined. The offense has the option of enforcing that penalty on the try for point OR on the succeeding kick off.

Eligible receivers: This is a very easy thing to understand. Who’s eligible to go down field and catch a forward pass? There are several factors when it comes to being eligible to go down field and catch a pass. 1. You MUST be numbered 1-49 OR 80-99. If you are numbered 50-70 you are PERMANENTLY INELIGIBLE to go down field for a pass. Nothing else matters, you are permanently ineligible. There is NO SUCH THING as a tackle eligible in high school or college football. Now, if you have the right number, then you have to be either in the backfield OR on the end of the line.

Horsecollar tackle – prohibits players from grabbing the INSIDE back or side of the shoulder pads OR jersey of the runner and subsequently pulling that opponent to the ground. Effective 2017, this now includes the name plate area of the jersey in addition to the inside back or side collar of the jersey or shoulder pads
Targeting. Any contact above the shoulders against a defenseless player. The contact does NOT have to be helmet to helmet. It’s any contact to an opponent ABOVE The shoulders. Ignore the announcers when they start discussing rule interpretations. They are usually wrong.

On a fumbled ball. Here’s a rule many may not know about. If on 1st, 2nd or 3rd down the offense fumbles and the ball stays inbounds, either team can recover and advance. However, if its 4th down and the ball is fumbled in advance of the runner, then anybody can recover it, but if the offense recovers it and it wasn’t the player that fumbled it to begin with, the ball still belongs to the offense but returns to the spot of the fumble. IF the player that actually fumbled the ball, does in fact recover it, it remains where he recovered his own fumble. If on any down the offense fumbles the ball and it goes out of bounds in advance of the spot of the fumble, then the ball belongs to the offense and is returned to the spot of the fumble.

lbzdually
09-21-2017, 04:09 PM
I know this a question of judgement, but why are RB's and pulling guards not called every time they move before the ball is snapped. Georgia tech's RB is starting to move forward before every snap, I thought a RB could only go in motion side to side.

AB, I'm so sorry to hear about your dad. I almost lost mine this summer, he was in ICU at the VA hospital for 3 weeks.

AlienBeans
09-22-2017, 11:11 AM
I know this a question of judgement, but why are RB's and pulling guards not called every time they move before the ball is snapped. Georgia tech's RB is starting to move forward before every snap, I thought a RB could only go in motion side to side.

AB, I'm so sorry to hear about your dad. I almost lost mine this summer, he was in ICU at the VA hospital for 3 weeks.

I dont see pulling guards moving early very often and I watch a lot of football film. As far as the running back goes, he can move parallel or away from the line of scrimmage. If the guard does move early its a false start. Rb moving could be illegal motion, illegal ahift or a false start depending on the actions of the other 10 players in the formation.

Thanks for the kind words too. Sorry to hear of your loss as well. My dad went to hospital on may 31 and passed june 3 at 815am. It would have been very hard on my mom to have him hanging on for weeks or months. We were both relieved it was a quick thing. He didnt want to be on any machines.

AlienBeans
09-23-2017, 01:27 PM
Here's something that most probably don't know is in the rule book. It's call MOMENTUM [high school] and IMPETUS [college]. So, let me put a play together to illustrate how this is applied.

Down and Distance doesn't matter here but for sake of discussion, let's set it all up. Offense with the ball 3rd and 8 from their opponents 20 yard line. QB throws down the field where the defense going back into coverage intercepts the pass at his own 4 yard line. While completing the catch, his momentum/Impetus takes him into the endzone where he either goes down or is tackled there. So, in this scenario, where do you spot the ball? We all know its an interception but where does the Intercepting team start their possession?

Answer: Momentum/Impetus applies to Interceptions/Kicks/Fumbles where the defensive team or receiving team acquires possession in the field of play from the 5 yard line to the goal line and his momentum to complete the catch, takes him into the endzone. When the defensive team/receiving team acquires possession anywhere from their own 5 to their own goal line AND his momentum takes him into the endzone, the ball is returned to the spot of the catch. In the situation above, the defense retains possession and will start their series at the 4 yard line, 1st and 10.

Now, take the momentum aspect out of it for a minute. If the defensive player makes the catch at the 4 yard line and moves left to right to avoid a tackle, then he is on his own. If he retreats into the endzone to avoid the tackle, and is tackled there, its a safety. Why? Because he went his on his own volition. The momentum from making the catch didn't cause him to go into the endzone. These will NEVER be touchbacks. They will either return to the spot where possession was established or its a safety.

What if he catches it at the 6 yard line and his momentum takes him into the endzone? SAFETY. Momentum/Impetus applies from the 5 yard line to the goal line.

The rule is enforced the same way for Scrimmage kicks [punts]. If the receiving team catches it inside the 5 yard line AND his momentum takes him into the endzone where he is downed or tackled, the ball returns to the spot of the catch, 1st and 10.

AlienBeans
09-23-2017, 04:11 PM
Every single week my opinion of announcers and their lack of knowledge when it comes to rules, gets confirmed. Just a few minutes ago, Cal/USC, Greg McElroy is the latest. Down and distance don't matter. Offensive play to the right side. Tackle on the left side delays a second and moves to the right and blocks the defender low at the back of the legs. Officials correctly throw the flag and correctly make the call. Personal Foul, Clipping. Replay, McElroy said he has to be engaged with another blocker and he doesn't agree with the call there. What McElroy exposed was his complete ignorance of the rules and not having any idea what the difference is between a clip and a chop block.

SECTION 5. Clipping
ARTICLE 1. a. Clipping is a block against an opponent in which the force
of the initial contact is from behind and at or below the waist (Rule 9-1-5).
b. The position of the blocker’s head or feet does not necessarily indicate
the point of initial contact.

text book example of what happened during the play not one mention above about a high/low combination block.

What he said needed to be in place to be a penalty.

Chop Block
ARTICLE 3. A chop block is a high-low or low-high combination block
by any two players against an opponent (not the ball carrier) anywhere on
the field, with or without a delay between blocks; the “low” component is
at the opponent’s thigh or below. (A.R. 9-1-10-I-IV). It is not a foul if the
blockers’ opponent initiates the contact. (A.R. 9-1-10-V)



So, I repeat. Never listed to announcers when it comes to rule interpretations.

AlienBeans
09-30-2017, 01:22 PM
Just happened. Vanderbilt vs. Florida. Vanderbilt QB back to pass, scrambles under heavy pressure. On the opposite side of the formation behind the QB, a Florida player loses his helmet. He continues to pursue the QB and assists his teammate in making the tackle for a loss. The other Florida player that made the tackle, grabs the QB facemask. So, we have TWO penalties here. 1. Facemask - 15 yards [this one was declined], 2. Personal Foul [participating without helmet] - 15 yards. Once a player loses his helmet he MUST stop participating in the play. If he continues to participate its a 15 yard penalty.

Continued Participation Without Helmet
ARTICLE 17. A player whose helmet comes completely off during a down
may not continue to participate beyond the immediate action in which he
is engaged, whether or not he puts the helmet back on during the down.
(A.R. 9-1-17-I)

lbzdually
10-14-2017, 07:33 PM
I watched this last night at a Georgia high football game. Ball is throw to the goal line, WR bobbles the ball and gains control, but takes no steps, falling into the endzone. As soon as he hit the ground the ball came out. It was ruled a TD. I thought the receiver had to have control all the way to the ground for it to count since he did not take any steps with the ball under control before crossing the goal line.

AlienBeans
10-15-2017, 10:33 AM
I watched this last night at a Georgia high football game. Ball is throw to the goal line, WR bobbles the ball and gains control, but takes no steps, falling into the endzone. As soon as he hit the ground the ball came out. It was ruled a TD. I thought the receiver had to have control all the way to the ground for it to count since he did not take any steps with the ball under control before crossing the goal line.
You said he gained control then fell into the endzone. Once he broke the plane of the goal line with possession (control), the play is dead, its a touchdown. Him going to the ground and losing the ball is immaterial. The score has already happened.

AlienBeans
11-19-2017, 05:25 PM
New play. Major props to the replay official in the Ole Miss / Texas A&M game. The replay official just stopped the game to review a potential targeting foul. The curious thing to me about the play is when the Referee announced the penalty after replay confirmed it, he announced it as a blind side block and gave no official signal, just stood there and called it a blind side block and that #28 is ejected. The part that stands out to me is that he called it a blind side block and not targeting. The NCAA doesn't have a rule in place for a blind side block. There is a blind side block penalty in high school that started this year, but Blind side block is legal [as of now] in the NCAA. There is a penalty for an unnecessary hit and for a defenseless player, but not a blind side block. What he should have said was Personal Foul, targeting. That would be a penalty for a blind side block in high school, but that was targeting under ncaa rules. Under high school rules a blind side block does not carry an ejection. Very poor explanation by the Referee on that call. Call was right, the explanation of it was way wrong.